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Point taken - we'll stick with this wording for now, but we'll keep an eye on whether this causes any confusion among SecureDrop users.

4 months ago

@eloquence Thanks, yet the credentials in themselves are not two-factor, so this wording sound inaccurate in English, even though you standardized this language throughout code and documentation.

4 months ago

Sorry for the late response! We think the potential for ambiguity is pretty small in English, and prefer to avoid the use of "2FA" which not everyone may be familiar with. We have therefore standardized on this language throughout code and documentation. See https://github.com/freedomofpress/securedrop/pull/5014 for background.

4 months ago
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User avatar AO_Localization_Lab

Resolved comment

The credentials in themselves are not two-factor. This could rather read: "Your 2FA credentials have been reset successfully."

a year ago
User avatar eloquence

Translation comment

As in other strings you commented on, we feel that the word "authentication" is implied in this context, and it is not necessary to spell it out, or to revert to the abbreviation "2FA".

a year ago
User avatar rmol

Translation comment

I'm guessing, but "hersteld" seems to have more the meaning of "restored" or "recovered". Is "opnieuw ingesteld" more like "reset", where you're starting over fresh?

12 months ago
User avatar gonzalo-bulnes

Translation comment

I see "contraseña" used in a string nearby. Would it be worth creating a Glossary entry for "password" and choose one consistent translation (whichever seems best)?

4 months ago
User avatar rmol

Translation comment

@gonzalo-bulnes That's a great suggestion, and we could certainly stand to make more use of the glossary to encourage consistency, but in this string, the two-factor credentials are distinct from the journalist's password, so I think "credenciales" is appropriate. Let me know if I misunderstood your question.

4 months ago
User avatar gonzalo-bulnes

Translation comment

Oops, apologies @rmol, somehow I posted this comment on the wrong string. I meant to leave this comment next to:

Clave o código de autenticación de dos factores incorrecto. (permalink)

I suggested to replace "Clave" by "Contraseña" there, but more than replacing one by the other I wanted to get some context on the use/not use of a Glossary in Spanish in case the were known trade-offs.

This clave-contraseña case reminded me of this Github issue about consistency of multi-auth terminology and I have the feeling that the exercise of composing a glossary for those recurrent terms could help identify current uses and later, using the glossary or glossaries could help translators providing feedback as well?

Indeed, is this the best place to ask about this? I'm happy to move the question wherever makes more sense.

4 months ago
User avatar eloquence

Resolved comment

Sorry for the late response! We think the potential for ambiguity is pretty small in English, and prefer to avoid the use of "2FA" which not everyone may be familiar with. We have therefore standardized on this language throughout code and documentation. See https://github.com/freedomofpress/securedrop/pull/5014 for background.

4 months ago
User avatar AO_Localization_Lab

Resolved comment

@eloquence Thanks, yet the credentials in themselves are not two-factor, so this wording sound inaccurate in English, even though you standardized this language throughout code and documentation.

4 months ago
User avatar eloquence

Resolved comment

Point taken - we'll stick with this wording for now, but we'll keep an eye on whether this causes any confusion among SecureDrop users.

4 months ago

Glossary

English English
No related strings found in the glossary.

Source information

Flags
python-brace-format, python-format, read-only
Source string location
journalist_app/account.py:52
String age
a year ago
Source string age
a year ago
Translation file
string