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@eloquence As I wrote, the code in itself is not two-factor. “2FA” is very common in apps. This could rather read: “There was a problem verifying the two-factor authentication code.”

4 months ago

I think some comments may have gotten lost :-(. I don't see my original response. I agree that this makes sense in the context of something like SSD, where terms can be introduced (as the term 2FA is on the page you link to), but I don't think the same argument can be made for UI copy, where a term often has to be used without introduction.

4 months ago
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User avatar AO_Localization_Lab

Resolved comment

The code in itself is not two-factor. This could rather read: "There was a problem verifying the 2FA code"

a year ago
User avatar eloquence

Translation comment

Hi AO, thanks for your comments on these strings. We've generally tried to avoid "2FA" in user-facing strings, because it is an abbreviation that can be alienating to people who have never encountered it. We feel that the word "authentication" is implied when speaking of "two-factor codes". Please see https://github.com/freedomofpress/securedrop/issues/2331 for additional discussions. When translating this term, do you feel that omitting the word "authentication" introduces unique problems in other languages?

a year ago
User avatar AO_Localization_Lab

Resolved comment

Hi eloquence, and thank you for your answer. Omitting the word "authentication" in English already makes for an odd sentence, and might lead to weird translations. As far as avoiding "2FA", we at the Localization Lab manage translations for some 80 apps and websites, and "2FA" is a very common tern in apps these days: https://ssd.eff.org/en/module/how-enable-two-factor-authentication

a year ago
User avatar eloquence

Translation comment

Hi AO, I agree that the EFF page is a good example of how to introduce a technical abbreviation well: the spelled out version, followed by "2FA", which itself links to a glossary entry. When you take all these steps to explain an abbreviation, it's not a problem to use it throughout the text. Note how the headline doesn't say "Enable 2FA", for example. In the context of the SecureDrop application, we don't currently have a UI facility for inline explanation of glossary terms, and the user may enter any part of the flow at any time (i.e. they may see "two-factor code" on the login, or have to reset their "two-factor credentials" at a later time). In this context, where you have 1) a lack of a contextual help, 2) random access into different parts of the flow by the user, we prefer to use the spelled out version.

a year ago
User avatar eloquence

Translation comment

BTW, the phrase "two-factor code" is not new to SecureDrop. It has been used on the login screen for a long time, and you'll find translations for it in Weblate. So, for example, the German translation for "two-factor code" in Weblate is "Zwei-Faktor-Code". What's new is that we're standardizing usage throughout SecureDrop on the shorter strings. I would recommend using the existing login translation as a starting point for how to translate "two-factor code", "two-factor secret" and "two-factor credentials".

a year ago
User avatar AO_Localization_Lab

Translation comment

Thank you eloquence. It would then be easy to introduce "two factor authentication (2FA)" early on in the UI so that users that are not yet familiar by the now common 2FA can learn what it is, and then use "2FA" in combination with code, secret, etc. thus also saving UI real estate. https://duckduckgo.com/?q=2fa

a year ago
User avatar eloquence

Resolved comment

I think some comments may have gotten lost :-(. I don't see my original response. I agree that this makes sense in the context of something like SSD, where terms can be introduced (as the term 2FA is on the page you link to), but I don't think the same argument can be made for UI copy, where a term often has to be used without introduction.

4 months ago
User avatar AO_Localization_Lab

Resolved comment

@eloquence As I wrote, the code in itself is not two-factor. “2FA” is very common in apps. This could rather read: “There was a problem verifying the two-factor authentication code.”

4 months ago

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Flags
python-brace-format, python-format, read-only
String age
a year ago
Source string age
a year ago
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